Announcement

Collapse

ANNOUNCEMENT - THE GROW SHOW

Got your cup of tea ready? Click here to discover even more green-fingered ideas over at The Grow Show. There?s loads of guides for gardening with kids, indoor growing, pressing flowers and even how to throw out the gardening rulebook entirely... Click here to learn something new.
See more
See less

Dog Problem

Collapse

X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dog Problem

    We've just "inherited" a new dog .... she's a Fell Terrier, almost 1 year old .... and we've got a little problem ....

    She was owned by a postman .... a couple of months ago, he gave her to the mother-in-law .... the mother-in-law had a heart attack, so the puppy has come to live with us and our other 3 dogs ....

    The puppy hasn't been trained .... so part of her training is to say "no" to her .... at which point she cowers down and pees .... and needs a lot of loving to reassure her .... it's like she's expecting a smack or something .... and she certainly won't get that here ....

    She's a lovely pup, lively, loves to jump up on the back of the settee or on the bed, loves to curl right up with us and go to sleep .... and it's a real shame she cowers and pees when she thinks she's been naughty ....

    I've never had a problem like this with dogs .... any ideas on what to do?!?!
    http://MeAndMyVeggies.blogspot.com

  • #2
    Just keep on loving and reassuring her, she'll get the hang of her new home very soon. And keep on with the "no", just make sure you don't shout when you say the word.

    How long have you had her?
    Last edited by rustylady; 04-09-2012, 03:47 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've had rescue dogs like that - untrained at 6 because they've always lived in kennels. You need to treat her as a young pup, take her outside regularly, praise her when she does the business. With luck she'll be empty when you have to say No to her for other reasons! You could use a different word like "don't" or "mustn't", see if that changes the way in which you say No to her. Shake your head as you say it. I always use hand signs as well when I say something, so a waggled finger as you say Don't may mean that before long you don't have to say anything.
      Having had 3 different owners, at least, in less than a year, its no surprise that she feels unsure of her self. She'll get there
      A Chicken walks with small steps. Be more Chicken
      https://gardenchicken.blogspot.com/
      @realveggiechicken

      Comment


      • #4
        Poor little love,

        As everyone has said, she'll get the hang of it soon enough. Sounds as if she is lucky to be in a caring home. Reassurance and, as VC says, praise when she gets something right and she'll be fine in no time.
        A garden is a lovesome thing, God wot! (Thomas Edward Brown)

        Comment


        • #5
          Its really just a submission thing with the pup they can do this when aproached by an adult dog, would think she will grow out of it especially when she sees the other dogs responding to the comand without worrying.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by veggiechicken View Post
            I've had rescue dogs like that - untrained at 6 because they've always lived in kennels. You need to treat her as a young pup, take her outside regularly, praise her when she does the business. With luck she'll be empty when you have to say No to her for other reasons! You could use a different word like "don't" or "mustn't", see if that changes the way in which you say No to her. Shake your head as you say it. I always use hand signs as well when I say something, so a waggled finger as you say Don't may mean that before long you don't have to say anything.
            Having had 3 different owners, at least, in less than a year, its no surprise that she feels unsure of her self. She'll get there
            This sounds like really good advice to me. I know more about horses but I would feel you need to be careful that she doesn't learn that cowering down and peeing on the floor is a good way to get a fuss. (With horses you have to be careful not to reinforce nervous behaviour by fussing them.)

            Could be worth talking to your local dogs' home they will have lots of experience of things like this and should be glad you've saved them another resident.

            Pob lwc! Give her a fuss from me.
            Last edited by marchogaeth; 04-09-2012, 05:34 PM.
            "A life lived in fear is a life half lived."

            PS. I just don't have enough time to say hello to everyone as they join so please take this as a delighted to see you here!

            Comment


            • #7
              Sound like she is a "submissive urinator"! We had a springer with the same problem.
              Submissive Urination | Dog Whisperer Cesar Millan

              Comment


              • #8
                The first thing you have to do is think about why she is so submissive, and then do not add to the problem by doing the the things that make her so nervous, which will just extend the bonding period between you.

                Start off by showing lots of love and high value rewards when she responds to something that is good and makes you happy. When she does something that goes against your moral values then simply, just ignore her for a very short amount of time, extending that time as she settles down and is responding to your loving behaviour. Scolding, saying no and/or raising your voice at this stage will not help.

                It will take a lot of patience on your part but take one day/step at a time. If you can find something that really gets her attention to the point of nothing else in the world matters because what you have to offer really is the best thing since sliced bread, then that would be the best way forwards. Sometimes that will be a high reward food treat or it could be a particular toy that is not available to them 24/7. That's up to you to find out what that is.

                The onus is on you to be mentally strong and consistent in your praise, rewards and when to ignore her. The balance on this will be the key to your success. The more consistent you can be, the faster she will settle into a routine.

                You are welcome to PM me at anytime for a chat. I'm not trained professionally as a dog trainer but I have been where you are before, and succeeded..

                We have just taken on a terrier, just over a week ago and we are dealing with his "issues" as well.

                Good luck and stick with her. She will get there, eventually

                Chris
                My new website for allotment beginners www.theallotmentshed.co.uk

                My Facebook page Please take the the time to "LIKE" https://www.facebook.com/theallotmentshed

                Follow on Twitter The Allotment Shed @TASallotment

                Comment


                • #9
                  Our black dog Knick Nac used to do that. We had her as a puppy and knew her owners and she had no mistreatment. Being a working dog x she was very energetic and excitable. When she came into the house in the evenings as our other dog did, she used to jump onto the lounge, or onto people's beds. We learned not to say NOOOOO. Very quickly. After we had to change several beds.
                  We started not bringing her in, but going outside to sit with her for a while, but she would streak thru your legs as you came out the door and pee as soon as she got in there!

                  She did eventially stop, and your post just reminded me of how annoying it was.

                  I think you'll find that having 3 other dogs may be what's setting her off. The new little dog we have is not submissive at all - he's about the same age as Knick Nac and they are always giving a grumble at each other trying to get the 2nd dog position in the pack.
                  Ali

                  My blog: feral007.com/countrylife/

                  Some days it's hardly worth chewing through the restraints!

                  One bit of old folklore wisdom says to plant tomatoes when the soil is warm enough to sit on with bare buttocks. In surburban areas, use the back of your wrist. Jackie French

                  Member of the Eastern Branch of the Darn Under Nutter's Club

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    no advice at all sorry, but where are the pics?! We need pics

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      From Scarlet's link:

                      "Submissive urination is a dog's uncontrollable, instinctive reaction to the presence of another dog or human that they feel is superior or is intimidating to them. It is a subconscious response that cannot be controlled. It is not a housebreaking issue"

                      Do read Cesar's advice in that link: ignore the weeing, certainly don't punish it and don't reassure/fuss the pup when it happens either. Praise it when it does the correct thing.

                      As for it's confidence, don't do anything that might intimidate it: don't shout, don't loom over it, don't raise voice or hands, even in excitement. Stay calm, speak calmly.
                      All gardeners know better than other gardeners." -- Chinese Proverb.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi,

                        Have a look here Adolescent Period (18 months) / Dog stage / Adaptil - The secret to happy dogs - Adaptil

                        Vets use and recomend this pheromone support when re training dogs, as it comforts them (as it woukd naturally from the mother) It dose work very well and comes with a money back guarantee from the vet. It is also used by dogs trust, blue cross, guide dogs etc due to the evidence behind it.

                        I do work for this company, so MODs feel free to delete, Farmer Gyles please PM me if you need info

                        Mandy x
                        Last edited by mandyballantyne; 09-09-2012, 03:10 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          cheers guys .... it's good to know it could just be the submissive thing and not something caused by abuse ....

                          situation has improved .... she's responding well to training and basic commands .... she's not cowering much now .... not peed for a few days, but can see it could happen again .... she's definitely trying to be a good girl, need to work on her attention span, but getting there .... it will just take time ....

                          i think she's learnt her place in the pack now and seems happy ... we've actually got 5 dogs because we've got the mother in law's other dog too ....

                          her tail doesn't stop wagging ..... unless she falls asleep!
                          http://MeAndMyVeggies.blogspot.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oh that tail wagging is more of a problem I find. Knick Nac has a 'coffee table height' tail.....so when she's happy, when's she's trying to make you happy....she wags.......TG for vinyl floor coverings! She's wagged many a glass of red wine onto the floor...........well actually I've started drinking out of plastic now!
                            Ali

                            My blog: feral007.com/countrylife/

                            Some days it's hardly worth chewing through the restraints!

                            One bit of old folklore wisdom says to plant tomatoes when the soil is warm enough to sit on with bare buttocks. In surburban areas, use the back of your wrist. Jackie French

                            Member of the Eastern Branch of the Darn Under Nutter's Club

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              had the same problem with buster's tail .... could sweep the entire coffee table clear in one go .... we now have taller, smaller tables in the corners where he can't get them!
                              http://MeAndMyVeggies.blogspot.com

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Recent Blog Posts

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X