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Grape vine iron deficiency mystery

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  • Grape vine iron deficiency mystery

    As some of you may remember, my allotment grape vines got badly hit by frost back in mid-May. They are both growing back nicely now, but on one of them almost all of the leaves are golden in colour, rather than green. I looked this up, and it seems it is almost certainly iron deficiency. Only iron deficiency will make the entire leaf, even the youngest, newest leaves, turn yellow like that. Other deficiencies cause inter-veinal yellowing or mottled yellowing, as too do any diseases which can cause yellowing.
    What's odd is that I am at a loss for what caused it to suddenly be deficient of iron. The previous growth, before the frost came, was green and healthy, and the other grape vine, grown just a few metres away on much the same soil, is green and healthy, as are the grape vines on other people's plots. It's just this one. I suppose the dry weather is a possibility, but I think I've been keeping it fairly well-watered.

    I plan on buying some sulphate of iron, both to add some to the soil and dissolve some in water to use as a foliar feed, and I've already given it a dressing of poultry manure, but I'm slightly concerned about what might have caused this, and whether it can be trusted to go away on its own with time and feeding.

  • #2
    Maybe you have a local patch of soil with a high pH. So no matter how much iron is in the soil, it isn't actually available to the plant.

    It is very strange, though, that this should have occurred after the frost plus not in previous years.

    Have you tested the soil pH just to see?
    Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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    • #3
      I haven't yet, no. I have some test strips, though, so I will test it today (if I remember).

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      • #4
        My auld Dad used to grow leeks in a sloped trench. At the top of the slope he had a pile of old rusty nails which he thought the rain would cause 'run off' and cure any iron deficiency. His logic seemed ok but his is the same fella that fed his leeks with old beer from the local club beer tanks and killed them all off.
        My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
        to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

        Diversify & prosper


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        • #5
          Tested the pH today. It's 7, or possibly 6.5, it's a little hard to tell. Either way, nothing that should cause such a severe iron deficiency.
          I sprinkled 30g of iron sulphate around the root area today and watered it in, as well as spraying the leaves with a 1% solution.

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          • #6
            Good luck. Hope it works for you.
            Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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            • #7
              Three days after spraying it, and the leaves are already noticeably greener. In fact most of them have fully recovered, and maybe only a quarter of them are still yellow.
              I'll keep spraying it once a week for a few weeks, until it has had a chance to start properly absorbing the iron sulphate I added to the soil.

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