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  • Mmmm... I've made a mistake.

    When I started chitting my first earlies in Feb my OH gave me two main crop from the kitchen cupboard which had sprouted and in my ignorance I planted them in a pot. They were an inch above the soil today and I've covered them with more compost. (The first earlies haven't come up yet). What will happen to them? Will they grow and produce potatoes? (all be it at the 'wrong time') Shall I just keep covering them as they pop up?

  • #2
    Are you planning to grow all your potatoes in pots Martha? Or do you have an allotment or garden to plant them in? Where are they growing at the moment? (the maincrops, that is)

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    • #3
      They are all growing in pots, I don't have room to put them in the ground, this is my first attempt at growing something edible apart from tomatoes and herbs.

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      • #4
        Can't see what the problem is, just keep covering up the shoots, the main crop in your pots will take about 13 weeks to grow. The problem might be if they get frosted, so keep them inside if there's a risk.
        To see a world in a grain of sand
        And a heaven in a wild flower

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        • #5
          Oh, thanks, I thought different types of potatoes should be grown at different times of year. Someone in another thread said he'd planted main crop by mistake and so had to dig them up.

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          • #6
            I was under the impression that the nomenclature appended to potatoes (ooh 'ark at 'er!) was to do with how long they took to grow, ie first earlies, second earlies, etc. Nothing to do with when they're planted except folk normally plant earlies as an early crop, because earlies take about 10 weeks to grow.

            Harvesting and storing potatoes:
            Harvest times depend on planting dates, weather and temperature at planting time, weather during the growing season, variety maturity and weather and temperature at harvest time. However, in general terms:

            First Earlies are best harvested in small quantities and eaten straightaway when fresh in June and July.
            Second Earlies and Salad varieties can also be harvested in small quantities and eaten when fresh in June and July. Alternatively, if the skins are allowed to ‘set' - i.e. they don't rub off when lifted - cut the foliage down to stop continued growth, lift in September and store as per Maincrop varieties.
            Maincrop varieties can be lifted from September onwards and stored as long as the tubers are lifted in dry conditions or are dried properly. Store in a hessian sack in a cool, dark, frost-free area.
            Last edited by smallblueplanet; 09-03-2008, 06:02 PM.
            To see a world in a grain of sand
            And a heaven in a wild flower

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            • #7
              Yeah, it sounds ok to me; at least they are growing!!! The only tip from my experience is don't move them about too violently, as the little potatoes will break off under the soil and they will have to start again!
              We had to move all my spuds last april when we moved house - I had put them all in pots and even though I was delicately moving them, they didn't like being moved.
              When you have got them in pots [sorry, just remembered this other thing] don't have them too close; as when they grow tall haulms, they will get really leggy and fall over if they are fighting each other for the light - so try and space them out if you can so that they all get enough.

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              • #8
                Thanks for that advice, up until now I have been moving them around because I don't know were they are going stay. I'd better move them to their permanent spot on the patio soon, before they start to grow. Where they are now is where the table and chairs go. Then again, they are in the sunniest spot. I think perhaps they should stay where they are and the table and chairs can move over.

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                • #9
                  Why don't you try putting the pots in place on the patio and, if the pot fits, place it under the table, and the chairs around it. This will give it some valuable protection until all this wind and possible frosts subside?!

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                  • #10
                    As they're maincrop just turn them out of the pot once the foliage has died back - at least there'll not be any guessing about iwhether or not they're ready like there could be if they were earlies. Just protect them from frost if one threatens and if you've nowhere to put them indoors covering with a thickish layer of newspaper should do the trick
                    Into each life some rain must fall........but this is getting ridiculous.

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